The Eyes by Edith Wharton

The Eyes by Edith Wharton
The Eyes by Edith Wharton

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This is a lovely edition from the folks at Galley Beggar Press as a part of their ghost story set.

This little book was a really interesting read for me. An old writer, having had some friends round for dinner proceeds to tell them how, on two occasions he has been haunted by a pair of disembodied eyes at the foot of his bed.

On one level it is a straightforward, rather creepy ghost story about a man who doesn’t behave very well towards his fiancée being made to pay by a malevolent sprit. However, after some consideration I wondered if there was a little bit more to this than met the, pardon the pun, eye.  Several aspects of it were nagging at me. A couple of hours of research later, and it is clear that readers from around the web all have very different and inconclusive ideas about what the eyes actually were.

I don’t want to give too much away, but would love to know if anyone else has read it, and what they thought the eyes were. 

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